A CALL TO ACTION :

 “ACCELERATE THE PACE TOWARDS ACHIEVING THE SDGs”

ADDRESSED TO

 

THE UNITED NATIONS

THE AFRICAN UNION

THE GOVERNMENTS OF ALL AFRICAN COUNTRIES

 

We, the civil society organizations from across Africa; community groups representing the youth, women, Persons with Disabilities, ethnic minorities; economically disadvantaged groups as well as individual participants from across the world; and who identify with the cause for social and economic justice and the value of achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in Africa;

 

Note with concern about the deteriorating life conditions of the poor and vulnerable groups of people in Africa occasioned by a range of human factors which continue to create barriers to the realisation of development goals (including the SDGs), freedoms and rights of the people;

 

Are alarmed by the following specific challenges, all of them man-made and avoidable; and we also share our thoughts on how they can be addressed:

 

  1. Slow Progress Towards SDGs Achievement

 

We acknowledge with appreciation that nearly all governments of the countries in Africa committed with honesty and sincerity to achieving the SDGs not later than the year 2030 as a development pledge to their citizens. However, we are disappointed that many countries in Africa lag far behind in the implementation of many of the SDGs mid-way to 2030 and that the continent trails all the other regions in implementation of the goals.

We in effect call on all the African governments to go beyond mere political statements to implement actual and transformative development projects and programs that guarantee the achievement of the SDGs within the next eight years. We further urge the African governments to strengthen plans and increase the pace of implementation of the AU Agenda 2063, the goals of which are consistent with the SDGs. We urge each African government to also prepare annual progress reports and share the same with its citizens as a measure of transparency and accountability on the implementation of these commitments including the AU Agenda 2063.

  1. COVID-19 Pandemic and Vaccine Inequality

We note with alarm that so far only about 20% (https://covid19.who.int/table) of Africa’s population of more than 1.3 billion people is fully vaccinated from the deadly virus compared to the global average of above 62%. Other regions of the world have already surpassed 50% coverage of their fully vaccinated. Coupled with Africa’s weak health Institutions, the continent continues to experience vaccine marginalisation arising from a global trade system that places the highest premium on business interests and far less, ironically, on saving human life. We note the heightened impact of the pandemic on women and girls, and the limited access to health services experienced by rural communities, Persons with Disabilities and other marginalized groups. We also note that along with vaccine inequity, our continent is also experiencing inequity in terms of tests and treatments, both critical tools to managing and responding to the pandemic and ensuring economic recovery during challenging times.

We therefore call on all African governments to put more effort to improve plans and mechanisms to avail COVID-19 vaccine, diagnostics and therapeutics to all their populations while ensuring that no groups are marginalised for whatever reasons. We urge all the African governments to continue to collectively address global challenges that affect access to COVID-19 vaccine, tests and therapeutics in Africa.

We call on African countries to speak with one voice in international forums regarding this pandemic. We encourage them to stick firmly to their position at the World Trade Organisation (WTO) to circumvent Intellectual Property barriers to lifesaving COVID-19 technologies and products established under the TRIPS Agreement. We call on the African governments to also engage actively in the WHO “pandemic treaty” negotiations and promote solutions that improve international collaboration and ensure that global public health considerations are prioritized over commercial interests.

We further urge all the African leaders to add strong and loud voices to the global effort by hundreds of civil society organisations led by global campaigns such as People’s Vaccine Alliance (PVA), in calling for sharing of COVID-19 technologies to countries across the world (including in Africa) that are capable of undertaking vaccine manufacturing. Above all, we urge African leaders to use the lesson of COVID-19 to expedite plans for permanent solutions to vaccine access for the continent by supporting Africa-led scientific innovations and local manufacturing and also device coordination mechanisms in line with the Africa Health Strategy.

We are further calling on the UN General Assembly to urgently and effectively provide effective leadership in addressing the global challenges of the vaccine inequalities through its relevant agencies especially the WTO. Finally, we highlight that any adequate responses developed to improve the response to COVID-19 will serve Africa well in responding to future pandemics, a future we must prepare for now.

  1. Persistent Insecurity and Poor Governance

 

We are concerned that out of the 32 countries in the world currently experiencing armed, violent and sustained conflicts, 16 are in Africa; and the effects of which are monumental including needless loss of human lives and displacement of millions of people from their homes. While each is the result of unique, context-specific circumstances, some general patterns are evident. Chief among these is the role of poor governance and social exclusion. Many more others are experiencing limited democratic spaces and a number are under authoritarian or autocratic leaderships.  The Sahel region is particularly affected by violent actions of extremist groups operating under the guise of religious fundamentalism especially jihadist groups.  The combination of these factors continues to limit freedoms of citizens, underpin exclusion, drive up poverty, deepen hopelessness, fuel civil strife and even needless loss of lives.

We call on African governments, the AU the UN and other international stakeholders to come together and address the root causes of many of these conflicts as most of them stem from well-known causes and vested interests, including social exclusion, undemocratic governance, corruption and illegal scramble for natural resources, the nature of which in many cases extends beyond the control of the countries caught up in the conflicts.

 

  1. Worsening Poverty Levels, Inequalities and Exclusion

 

We note with disappointment that of the 27 countries worldwide currently ranked by World Bank as Low Income Economies, indicating they are the very poorest countries in the world, 23 are located in Africa, specifically in the Sub-Saharan Africa and where hundreds of millions of people continue living in abject  poverty or on less than 1.9 US dollars per day.  We further note that the number increased recently due to the effects of COVID-19 pandemic between the years 2020 and 2022.  This situation is further exacerbated by failed and unsustainable economic models adopted by many African governments where opportunity is available only to a few, well connected people to the exclusion of majority of citizens, thus driving up poverty, inequalities, and where the rich are getting richer while the poor are becoming poorer.

 

We urge African government leaders to address extreme poverty, inequality and social exclusion in all African countries   through sustainable economic models, just and equitable recovery measures as well as sustainable and effective social protection mechanisms targeting People with Disabilities, women, the youth, low wage workers, ethnic minorities and other vulnerable groups indiscriminately. We demand the abandonment of unfair and failed economic policies; exclusion of any sections of populations from mainstream development plans; debilitating austerity economic programmes; underhand, unfair and illegal dealings with foreign business companies on Africa’s natural resources as they only fuel armed conflicts on the continent with crippling impacts on the already poor and vulnerable groups. We encourage African governments   to introduce Wealth Tax as a redistributive mechanism to generate resources to fund much needed investments in health, education and social service delivery.

 

  1. Sovereign Debt

 

We note with grave concern the growing trend of many governments of African countries of contracting increasingly unsustainable foreign debts through opaque means while using key national and public assets as collaterals to secure the public loans. We note that huge chunks of national revenues collected by these countries through high public taxations are currently channeled to service the foreign debts denying investment in other development sectors especially the social sector which is the most adversely affected. At worst, trends of default to repayment of these debts are beginning to emerge threatening not only the security but also the sovereignty of some countries in Africa.

 

We therefore demand that African governments develop comprehensive national debt sustainability plans to wean their countries off debt-fueled economic growth at the expense of the masses. To the foreign lenders of these unsustainable debts, we reiterate our demand for Debt Cancellation now as a matter of justice.

 

We urge the UNGA and G20 to vigorously pursue legally-binding measures to compel Private Creditors to participate in the already limited and inadequate debt restructuring measures such as the G20’s Common Framework for Debt Treatments. We further urge global leaders to collectively amplify the development of a global sovereign debt restructuring mechanism. We urge African countries to invest in the strengthening of Parliamentary accountability, monitoring and oversight in debt contraction and repayment processes.

  1. Climate Change Disasters and Justice for Poor Communities

We agree with climate scientists’ continuous, empirical assertions and warnings that the global climate is changing due to human activity and in a manner that threatens existence of all forms of life on the planet including human life. The widespread use of fossil fuel remains a key driver to this negative change. We are concerned that manifestations of this change as experienced in Africa include, among others, frequent and unprecedented floods and droughts resulting to wanton destruction of property, farmlands, settlements and causing deaths of people, livestock and wildlife. We are further concerned that poor communities in many parts of Africa are hit the hardest, despite contributing very little to the causes of the phenomenon.

We therefore urge African leaders to commit to rights-focused and people-centered actions to help poor and vulnerable groups in the Region to address climate adaptation challenges and increasing related losses and damages. We call on African leaders to create regional funds to increase the Region’s capacity to adapt to effects of climate change and also to move towards a just, clean and inclusive energy transition with a priority focus on increasing access to cheaper decentralised renewable energy, ending deforestation, reducing household energy poverty and powering key economic sectors. We urge African leaders to increase support and financing towards locally-led adaptation processes and disaster reduction mainstreaming in plans targeting vulnerable groups such as smallholder farmers, pastoralists, fishing communities and others.   We call upon African leaders to collectively engage global leaders during the upcoming COP 27 Summit in Egypt and at the UNGA for increased accountability on pollution to poor communities especially in Africa within the framework of UNFCCC and other globally agreed accountability mechanisms.

  1. Shrinking Civic Engagement Spaces

We are concerned by the many civic engagement space issues relating to threats to liberties, freedoms and rights of association and assembly in many African countries, and which affect genuine and constructive activities of many civil society organisations. We are concerned by the increasingly shrinking civic space characterized by violations of these rights, harassment and enactment of repressive laws with unclear, overbearing, overstepping, or outright brutality by state security agencies in some African countries under the pretext of maintaining law and order.

We therefore urge African governments to align legislative frameworks, policy and practice to constitutional provisions that guarantee civic and political rights. We condemn the increased cases of state-sponsored harassment and abuse targeting civil society, religious organisations, student leaders and Human Rights Defenders especially during election campaigns on the continent.

 Signed,

  1. Cadre de Concertation des ONG et Associations actives en Education de Base au Burkina Faso (CCEB)
  2. GCAP Senegal
  3. Nigeria Network of NGOs (NNNGO)
  4. Reseau Des Organisations du Secteur Educatif du Niger (ROSEN)/GCAP Niger
  5. Jeunes Verts – Togo
  6. Nobel Delta Women for Peace and Development Int’l (NDWPD) – Nigeria
  7. L’Action Mondiale Contre la Pauvreté (AMCP)/AMASBIF – Mali
  8. Youth Partnership for Peace and Development (YPPD) – Sierra Leone
  9. GCAP Ghana
  10. Lutte Nationale Contre La Pauvrete (LUNACOP) – D.R. CONGO
  11. TUMUKUNDE/GCAP Rwanda
  12. SAHRiNGON – Tanzania Chapter
  13. Halley Movement – Mauritius
  14. Civil Society SDGs Campaign GCAP Zambia
  15. Council for Non-Governmental Organisations of Malawi (CONGOMA)
  16. National Association of Non-Governmental Organisations (NANGO) – Zimbabwe
  17. Step Up Youth Initiative – Uganda
  18. GCAP Global

Download the PDF version of this document HERE.


[FRENCH] 

Appel à l’action :

 «Accélérer le rythme  pour la réalisation des ODD»

ADRESSÉ À

LES NATIONS UNIES

L’UNION AFRICAINE

LES GOUVERNEMENTS DE TOUS LES PAYS D’AFRIQUE ET DU MONDE

 

Nous, Organisations de la société civile Africaines toutes confindues, les groupes communautaires représentant les jeunes, les femmes, les personnes handicapées, les minorités ethniques, les groupes économiquement défavorisés ainsi que les participants individuels du monde entier, qui défendons la cause de la justice sociale et économique ainsi que la valeur globale de la réalisation des objectifs de développement durable (ODD);

Exprimons notre inquiétude quant à   la détérioration de la situation des pauvres et des groupes vulnérables en Afrique. Cette dégradation résulte d’une série de facteurs humains qui créent des obstacles à la réalisation des objectifs de développement, y compris les ODD, les libertés et les droits des personnes ;

Nous sommes indignés   des nombreux défis spécifiques engendrés par l’homme. Pourtant certains de ces défis pouvaient être évités.  De ce point de vue, nous souhaitons   partager nos réflexions sur la façon dont les défis devraient être abordés:

  1. Des Progrès Lents Vers la Réalisation des ODD

Nous reconnaissons avec satisfaction que presque tous les gouvernements des pays d’Afrique se sont engagés avec sincérité à réaliser les ODD au plus tard en 2030. Cependant, nous sommes déçus du fait que de nombreux pays d’Afrique restent très en retard dans la mise en œuvre de plusieurs des ODD à mi-chemin de 2030 et que le continent soit la dernière des régions dans la mise en œuvre des objectifs.

Nous appelons, par conséquent, tous les gouvernements Africains à aller au-delà des simples déclarations politiques et à mettre en œuvre des projets et des programmes de développement réels et transformateurs qui garantissent la réalisation des ODD dans les années qui nous séparent de 2030. En outre, nous exhortons les gouvernements africains à renforcer les plans et à accélérer le rythme de mise en œuvre de l’Agenda 2063 de l’UA, dont les objectifs sont compatibles avec les ODD. Nous demandons instamment à chaque gouvernement Africain de préparer des rapports d’activités  annuels et de les partager avec ses citoyens, afin de garantir la transparence et la responsabilité de la mise en œuvre de ces engagements internationaux en matière de développement, y compris l’Agenda 2063 de l’UA.

 

  1. COVID-19 Pandémie et Inégalité Face aux Vaccins

Nous constatons avec déception  qu’à ce jour, seuls 20% (https://covid19.who.int/table) de la population Africaine, qui compte plus de 1,3 milliard de personnes, sont entièrement vaccinés contre la pandémie mortelle, alors que la moyenne mondiale est de 62 %. D’autres régions du monde ont déjà dépassé la couverture de 50% de leur populations entièrement vaccinées. L’Afrique continue de subir la marginalisation des vaccins, conséquence d’un système commercial mondial qui privilégie les intérêts commerciaux au détriment de la sauvegarde de la vie humaine.

Nous appelons ainsi les gouvernements africains à redoubler d’efforts pour améliorer les plans et les mécanismes permettant de mettre le vaccin à la disposition de toutes leurs populations, tout en veillant à ce qu’aucun groupe ne soit marginalisé pour quelque raison que ce soit. Nous exhortons tous les gouvernements africains à relever collectivement les défis qui continuent d’affecter le faible approvisionnement en vaccins de l’Afrique, en particulier, les régimes commerciaux tels que les brevets et les droits de propriété intellectuelle, dont l’application à l’approvisionnement en vaccins COVID-19 désavantage le continent Africain avec des conséquences mortelles. Nous demandons en outre à tous les dirigeants africains d’ajouter une voix forte et puissante à l’effort mondial de centaines d’organisations de la société civile, mené par des activistes mondiaux tels que People Vaccine Alliance (PVA), pour exiger le transfert des technologies du COVID-19 vers d’autres pays capables d’entreprendre la fabrication de vaccins, y compris en Afrique. Au delà, nous demandons instamment aux dirigeants africains d’utiliser la leçon de COVID-19 pour accélérer les plans de solutions permanentes au défi vaccinal du continent en soutenant l’innovation scientifique et la fabrication locale dirigées par les africains, conformément à la Stratégie Africaine de la santé. Nous demandons en aussi à l’Assemblée générale des Nations Unies de prendre d’urgence l’initiative de s’attaquer efficacement aux problèmes mondiaux comme l’inégalité en matière de vaccins par l’intermédiaire de ses agences compétentes, notamment WTO (l’OMC).

  1. Insécurité Persistante et Mauvaise Gouvernance

Nous sommes préoccupés par le fait qu’au moins 16 pays connus en Afrique connaissent des conflits armés durables dont les effets sont désastreux, notamment la perte inutile de vies humaines et le déplacement de millions de personnes de leurs foyers. Bien que chaque conflit soit le résultat de circonstances uniques et spécifiques à un contexte, certaines tendances générales sont évidentes. Le plus important est l’effet de la mauvaise gouvernance et de l’exclusion. De nombreux autres pays connaissent des espaces démocratiques limités et un certain nombre sont dirigés par des leaderships autoritaires ou autocratiques.  La région du Sahel est particulièrement touchée par les actions violentes de groupes extrémistes opérant sous le couvert du fondamentalisme religieux.  La combinaison de ces facteurs de limitent les libertés des citoyens, favorisent l’exclusion, accroîssent la pauvreté, aggravent le désespoir, et entrainent   des troubles civils, des conflits armés et même des pertes de vies.

Nous appelons les gouvernements africains, l’UA, les Nations Unies et les autres parties prenantes internationales à s’unir pour s’attaquer aux causes profondes des conflits, car la plupart d’entre eux découlent de causes bien connues et d’intérêts particuliers, notamment l’exclusion sociale, la gouvernance non démocratique, la corruption et la ruée vers les ressources naturelles.

  1. Aggravation des Niveaux de Pauvreté, des Inégalités et de l’Exclusion

Nous constatons avec dépit que sur les 27 pays du monde actuellement classés par la Banque mondiale dans la catégorie des pays les plus pauvres du monde, 23 sont situés en Afrique, plus précisément en Afrique subsaharienne, où des dizaines voire des centaines de millions de personnes vivent dans une pauvreté abjecte avec moins de 1,9 dollar US par jour.  Nous notons également que ce nombre a augmenté récemment en raison des effets de la pandémie de COVID-19 entre les années 2020 et 2022.  Cette situation est encore exacerbée par l’échec des modèles économiques non durables adoptés par de nombreux gouvernements africains, où les opportunités ne sont accessibles qu’à quelques personnes bien connectées, à l’exclusion de la majorité des citoyens.

Nous demandons aux dirigeants des gouvernements africains de s’attaquer aux inégalités extrêmes et à l’exclusion dans tous les pays africains par le biais de modèles économiques durables, de mesures de relance justes et équitables ainsi que de mécanismes de protection sociale durable et efficace ciblant les personnes handicapées, les femmes, les jeunes, les travailleurs à bas salaire, les minorités ethniques et les autres groupes vulnérables sans distinction. Nous demandons l’abandon des politiques économiques injustes et inefficaces, l’exclusion de toute partie de la population des principaux plans de développement, des programmes économiques d’austérité, des accords sournois, injustes et illégaux avec des sociétés étrangères sur les ressources naturelles Africaines. Nous encourageons les gouvernements Africains à introduire l’impôt sur la fortune comme mécanisme de redistribution afin de générer des ressources pour financer les investissements indispensables dans la santé, l’éducation et la prestation de services sociaux.

  1. La Dette Souveraine

Nous notons avec une grande inquiétude la tendance croissante des gouvernements de nombreux pays africains à contracter des dettes étrangères de plus en plus insoutenables par des moyens opaques, tout en utilisant des actifs nationaux et publics essentiels comme garantie pour les prêts publics. Nous constatons que d’énormes parties des recettes nationales perçues par ces pays par le biais d’impôts publics élevés sont actuellement consacrées au service de la dette extérieure, privant ainsi d’investissements d’autres secteurs de développement, notamment le secteur social qui est le plus touché., Des tendances au défaut de paiement de ces dettes commencent à se dessiner, menaçant la souveraineté de certains pays africains.

Nous demandons donc aux gouvernements africains d’élaborer des plans globaux de viabilité de la dette nationale afin de sevrer leurs pays d’une croissance économique alimentée par la dette aux dépens des masses. Nous réitérons notre appel à l’annulation immédiate de la dette, qui est une question de justice. Nous demandons instamment à l’Assemblée Générale des Nations Unies et au G20 de faire pression en faveur de mesures juridiquement contraignantes pour obliger les créanciers privés à participer aux mesures de restructuration de la dette, déjà limitées et inadéquates, telles que le Cadre commun de traitement de la dette du G20. Nous exhortons en outre les dirigeants mondiaux à amplifier collectivement le développement d’un mécanisme mondial de restructuration de la dette souveraine. Nous exhortons les pays Africains à investir dans le renforcement de la responsabilité, du suivi et de la surveillance parlementaires dans les processus de contraction et de remboursement de la dette.

  1. Catastrophes Liées au Changement Climatique et Justice Pour les Communautés Pauvres

Nous sommes d’accord avec les affirmations et les avertissements continus et empiriques des climatologues selon lesquels le climat mondial est en train de changer en raison de l’activité humaine et d’une manière qui menace l’existence de toutes les formes de vie sur la planète, y compris la vie humaine. L’utilisation généralisée des combustibles fossiles reste un facteur clé de ce changement négatif. Nous sommes préoccupés par le fait que les manifestations de ce changement, telles qu’elles sont vécues en Afrique, comprennent, entre autres, des inondations et des sécheresses fréquentes d’une ampleur sans précédent, qui entraînent la destruction gratuite de biens, de terres agricoles et d’établissements humains et la mort de personnes, de bétail et d’animaux sauvages. Nous sommes également préoccupés par le fait que les communautés pauvres de nombreuses régions d’Afrique sont plus durement touchées alors qu’elles n’ont rien ou presque rien à voir avec ce phénomène.

Nous exhortons donc les dirigeants africains à s’engager dans des actions fondées sur les droits et centrées sur les personnes pour aider les groupes pauvres et vulnérables à faire face aux défis de l’adaptation au climat et à l’augmentation des pertes et dommages. Nous appelons les dirigeants africains à créer des fonds régionaux pour accroître la capacité de la région à s’engager dans une transition énergétique juste, propre et inclusive, en se concentrant en priorité sur l’amélioration de l’accès à des énergies renouvelables décentralisées et moins chères, sur la fin de la déforestation, sur la réduction de la pauvreté énergétique des ménages et sur l’alimentation des secteurs économiques clés. Nous exhortons les dirigeants africains à accroître le soutien et le financement des processus d’adaptation menés localement et l’intégration de la prévention des catastrophes dans les plans ciblant les groupes vulnérables tels que les petits agriculteurs, les éleveurs, les communautés de pêcheurs et autres.   Nous appelons les dirigeants africains à engager collectivement les dirigeants mondiaux lors du prochain sommet de la COP 27 en Égypte et à l’Assemblée générale des Nations unies pour une plus grande responsabilité en matière de pollution pour les communautés pauvres, en particulier en Afrique, dans le cadre de la CCNUCC et d’autres mécanismes de responsabilité mondiale.

  1. Le Rétrécissement des Espaces d’Engagement Civique

Nous sommes préoccupés par les nombreux problèmes d’espace d’engagement civique liés à la police démocratique et au respect des droits fondamentaux d’association et de réunion dans de nombreux pays africains, et qui affectent les activités authentiques de nombreuses organisations de la société civile. Nous sommes préoccupés par le rétrécissement croissant de l’espace civique, caractérisé par les violations de ces droits, le harcèlement et la promulgation de lois répressives dont l’application par les agences de sécurité de l’État est peu claire, excessive, outrepassant les limites ou carrément brutale dans certains pays africains.

Nous exhortons donc les gouvernements africains à aligner les cadres législatifs, les politiques et les pratiques sur les dispositions constitutionnelles qui garantissent les droits civiques et politiques. Nous condamnons l’augmentation des cas de harcèlement et d’abus parrainés par l’État visant la société civile, les organisations religieuses, les leaders étudiants et les jeunes défenseurs des droits de l’homme, en particulier pendant les campagnes électorales sur le continent.

Signé

  1. Cadre de Concertation des ONG et Associations actives en Education de Base au Burkina Faso (CCEB)
  2. GCAP Senegal
  3. Nigeria Network of NGOs (NNNGO)
  4. Reseau Des Organisations du Secteur Educatif du Niger (ROSEN)/GCAP Niger
  5. Jeunes Verts – Togo
  6. Nobel Delta Women for Peace and Development (NDWPD) – Nigeria
  7. L’Action Mondiale Contre la Pauvreté (AMCP) – Mali
  8. Youth Partnership for Peace and Development (YPPD) – Sierra Leone
  9. GCAP Ghana
  10. Lutte Nationale Contre La Pauvrete (LUNACOP) – D.R. CONGO
  11. TUMUKUNDE/GCAP Rwanda
  12. SAHRiNGON – Tanzania Chapter
  13. Halley Movement – Mauritius
  14. Civil Society SDGs Campaign GCAP Zambia
  15. Council for Non-Governmental Organisations of Malawi (CONGOMA)
  16. National Association of Non-Governmental Organisations (NANGO) – Zimbabwe
  17. Step Up Youth Initiative – Uganda
  18. GCAP Global

Téléchargez la version PDF de ce document ICI.